Breast Augmentation vs. Breast Lift – Know it all!

Like many women, you may find yourself choosing between these two procedures or choosing both. Each has its own unique goals, and the procedures are often combined to achieve an even more attractive curvature.

Breast Augmentation Goals
The goal of breast augmentation surgery is to make your breasts bigger and/or fuller (more projected). Women differ so vastly in shape, size, and frame that a number of options have been developed that offer something for everyone. You can choose from:

  1. Silicone gel or saline implants
  2. Textured or smooth surfaced implants
  3. Implant placement behind the breast tissue or behind the pectoralis muscle
  4. Round or tear-drop (anatomical) implants
  5. Various sizes of implants
  6. Different sites for the incision (breast fold, armpit or nipple areola complex)

Breast Lift Goals
Breast lift surgery is designed to elevate sagging breasts and restore their youthful, perky stature. Gravity, pregnancy and weight gain have a way of stretching even smaller breasts over time. Weight loss may leave breasts less firm and a bit saggy. Breast lift surgery involves elevating the nipples and lightening the breast skin to restore breasts to an attractive shape.

Breast Lift with Breast Augmentation Goals
The lift removes the excess skin and reduces sagging (pushes things “up and in”). The implant fills the remaining breast skin, adding contour and fullness where minimal breast tissue is insufficient (pushes things “out and down”). As you can see, the forces are opposing, and for that reason, there is a 20 % revision rate for this procedure.

What Makes the Difference?
What makes the biggest difference in outcomes is that the most successful plastic surgeons use the following techniques and protocols:

  1. Minimal blood loss, bruising and swelling by using electrocautery for dissection of the pocket, as well as, gentle manipulation of the tissues
  2. Smaller incisions
  3. No sutures for removal
  4. Specialised instruments for accurate placement of an implant
  5. Adequate pain relief postoperatively
  6. No drains or wraps to manage
  7. Avoidance of blood thinning agents perioperatively (cease multi-vitamins, aspirin, NSAIDs etc.)

 

Thanks for reading!

Dr. Tim – Sydney Cosmetic Plastic Surgeon

www.cosmeticculture.com.au
www.drtim.com.au

Why “Celebrity Imitation” with Cosmetic Surgery?

Why do people try to imitate celebrities’ actual faces and bodies? Why do people think that a celebrity’s physical appearance can be copied? Occasionally I would get a patient presenting to my office for consultation requesting Nicole Kidman’s nose or Kim Kardashian’s butt. Cosmetic surgery is not the same as Mr. and Mrs. Potato Heads, with interchangeable noses, ears, lips etc.

Plastic surgeons must work with what you have (reality) and you must understand that what you want (desire) may not be achievable.

We as plastic surgeons are trained to perform delicate operations to enhance or improve people’s physical characteristics in an effort to acquire a more desirable feature. We are also taught to operate within the safest parameters possible because cosmetic surgery is elective surgery, which means it’s a want not a need. Therefore, it is vital for us to properly screen all prospective patients to be certain that they are safe candidates for this surgery. There are basic conditions that should be considered, contraindications to surgery which include physical abnormalities, medical problems that can complicate the surgery or put the patient at unnecessary risk, psychological abnormalities, unrealistic expectations, inappropriate motivations and inherent physical characteristics that hinder the achievement of the best possible result.

For people considering “celebrity imitation”, you should reconsider why you want to look like a particular celebrity.

Why is it that you are trying to become someone else? Why are you unhappy with you?  Furthermore, what if a celebrity’s image changes? As they say, “the media darling of this week is the rehab tabloid queen the next.”

Cosmetic surgery is a big change and so it’s important not to lose yourself as you start to look like someone else. I am reminded from a quote of Oscar Wilde, ”Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

Question: Is it worth getting cosmetic surgery to look like a celebrity?  You can leave a comment below.

Supplements and Cosmetic Surgery

Herbal supplements and vitamins are known to have a significant and measurable effect on promoting wound healing, reducing bruising,  enhancing immunity, and reducing oxidation caused by both surgery and anaesthetic drugs. However, these supplements are still drugs that could cause dangerous side effects during cosmetic surgery. About 50% of cosmetic surgery patients take supplements (usually more than one), but often do not tell their surgeons because they assume they are safe.  Some  of  the  most  popular  herbal  supplements  taken  are  chondroitin,  echinacea, and  glucosamine:

  • Chondroitin is often used to treat osteoarthritis.  People using chondroitin may suffer from bleeding complications during surgery, particularly when used in combination with doctor-prescribed blood-thinning medications (like warfarin).
  • Echinacea is often used for the prevention and treatment of viral, bacterial and fungal infections, as well as chronic wounds, ulcers, and arthritis.  However, it can trigger immunosuppression, causing poor wound healing and infection.
  • Glucosamine, often offered in conjunction with chondroitin, contains chemical elements that mimic human insulin, and may artificially cause low blood sugars during surgery.

Other common supplements taken by patients that may cause thinning of the blood are the “4  Gs”  (gingko biloba, garlicginseng, and ginger), fish oils and Vitamin E.

Cosmetic surgery should be viewed with the same care and concern as heart or brain surgery. Everything we do is important for our patients, so every precaution and safety should be taken to minimise complications from surgery and anaesthesia. Remember, we need your help and cooperation at all times.  Advise us of every drug you take, prescribed and non-prescribed and cease taking any blood thinning agents 2 weeks prior to surgery unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

Thanks for reading!

Dr. Tim  –  Sydney  Cosmetic  Plastic  Surgeon

www.cosmeticculture.com.au
www.drtim.com.au

Wabi-Sabi In Cosmetic Surgery – Imperfect, Impermanent, and Incomplete.

Celebrities, models, and socialites have highlighted some severe complications (including death) from undergoing cosmetic surgery in their pursuit of perfection. This is very concerning and makes me reflect on what beauty is all about. I am reminded at this point of Wabi-Sabi, the Japanese philosophy that embraces the beauty of things imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete.

It is a beauty of things modest and humble. It would be interesting to see how much of this ancient Japanese philosophy could be embraced in the world of cosmetic surgery and what a difference it could make.

Wabi-Sabi represents the exact opposite of the Western ideal of great beauty as something symmetrical, extraordinary and enduring. Wabi-Sabi is about the minor and the hidden, the tentative and the ephemeral: things so subtle and evanescent they are invisible to unrefined eyes.

Simplicity is at the core of things Wabi-Sabi. Wabi-Sabi embraces the “less is more” ideal talked about today, yet often ignored. Cosmetic surgery needs a lot of Wabi-Sabi.

Thanks for reading!

Dr.  Tim  –  Sydney  Cosmetic  Plastic  Surgeon

www.cosmeticculture.com.au
www.drtim.com.au

What Is a Mummy Makeover?

Many of today’s mums don’t feel they should sacrifice the way they look just because they’ve had children. After multiple pregnancies and breastfeeding, many women find it impossible for diet and exercise alone to restore their figures. These women usually want their tummies and breasts back the way they looked before pregnancy.

These so-called “Mummy Makeovers” are usually performed on women in their 30s or early 40s. There are multiple variations of the Mummy Makeover, of course, and I individualise the plan for each patient depending on their needs. Many women will not need or desire all of these procedures. Each patient determines what her personal Mummy Makeover will involve after we discuss her concerns and options in a thorough consultation.

A Mummy Makeover may be performed in one or more stages. Age, health, needs, and desires are all considered carefully when I formulate a plan for each patient. The majority of my patients choose to do more than one procedure at a time. I’ve had a great deal of experience performing these combined surgeries over the past decade. We take many steps to assure both minimal pain and maximum safety during our procedures:

  1. TUMMY TUCK: The tummy tends to experience the greatest change following pregnancy with stretch marks, loose skin and lower tummy fat being the most common complaints. The tummy muscles may also be stretched to the point that they remain separated in the midline, accentuating the patient’s lower tummy bulge. To treat these problems, I perform a tummy tuck where I remove the excess skin and fat from the tummy and tighten the muscles. Whenever we do a tummy tuck as part of the Mummy Makeover, we perform liposuction and pay special on to the belly button to help create a nice looking midriff.
  2. LIPOSUCTION: After having children, fat tends to redistribute to new areas on the body where it may be unwanted. This is frequently true even if women are successful at losing their baby weight. Most often, bulges of fat accumulated around the waist and on the thighs. On these areas, I frequently perform liposuction as part of a Mummy Makeover.
  3. BREAST SURGERY: The breasts go through dramatic changes with pregnancy and breastfeeding. Patient concerns about their breasts vary greatly, but the most common breast procedures I perform as part of a Mummy Makeover include:

Many of our patients for the Mummy Makeover travel from places outside of Sydney. Our staff can help with the planning of these sorts of trips through our CosmeticCulture Makeover Vacation Program, which makes travel for cosmetic surgery quite easy. More information is available on our website www.cosmeticculture.com.au, including descriptions of tummy tuck and breast augmentation or breast lifts as well as liposuction. You can also email us for more information at info@drtim.com.au or call us at 13000DRTIM.

Question:  Which parts of your post-childbirth body would you like to change with a Mummy Makeover? You can leave a comment below.

Look Younger for 2019!

 

These are my top 10 hints for looking good next year:

  1. Eat well. Preferably, eat smaller meals as the day goes by and eat frequently. Make it a habit not to eat after 9 pm.
  2. Exercise regularly. Remember: ”healthy body, healthy mind!”
  3. Keep your weight stable and within normal limits. Being overweight can predispose you to certain cancers and diabetes, not to mention, heart attacks, strokes and leg ulcers.
  4. Get your general practitioner to do a physical examination and if necessary, run some basic blood tests.
  5. Avoid the 4”S”: sun, stress, smoking and sleepless nights. These can hasten your aging!
  6. Think skin rejuvenation i.e.; microdermabrasion, peels and laser skin tightening. These will give your skin a definite glow!
  7. Start getting anti-wrinkle injections to iron-out those wrinkles that make you a more youthful appearance!
  8. Use fillers to pump-up that lost volume in the cheeks etc. As we age, the fat melts away in certain pockets in the face as does the underlying bony platform. The end result is excess skin that combines with gravity to make it sag. This effect can be countered by using either synthetic fillers or fat injections.
  9. Think minimal scar surgery to rejuvenate the face e.g. a neck lift or remove those bags under the eyes.
  10. Think about a surgical rejuvenation of the upper eyelids and brows by giving them a lift. The eyes and brows are often the first signs of aging in a woman and they usually start to sag in their early 40s.  Remember, ”the eyes are the windows of your soul” and may tell us a lot about your self-esteem and body image.

Thanks for reading!

Dr. Tim – Sydney Cosmetic Plastic Surgeon

www.cosmeticculture.com.au
www.drtim.com.au

Breast Augmentation Part 3 of 4: The Plastic Surgeon

I am amazed at how many patients spend more time shopping for a TV or washing machine than they spend selecting a plastic surgeon. Selecting your surgeon should be the single most important thing that you can do to assure an optimal result.

You should have a checklist of essential things to look for in a plastic surgeon:

1)  Certified by the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, the only college recognised by the Australian Medical Council that can train surgeons in Australia

2)  Be a Member of the Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) and the Australasian Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS)

3)  Has hospital privileges to do breast augmentation at an accredited hospital or day surgery facility

4)  Subspecialises in cosmetic surgery

5)  Super specialises in breast augmentation

6)  Recommended by a knowledgeable friend or doctor

7)  Has a curriculum vitae that documents scientific presentations and publications

There are also a few less reliable points that I would like to address when choosing a plastic surgeon. Advertisements and media coverage is paid for by the plastic surgeon and does not necessarily reflect how knowledgeable, competent or experienced they are. Your local doctor may not be in the know of who is best to do breast augmentation and may not have an interest in cosmetic surgery to find out either. Some just refer to surgeons who are their friends from medical school, are in the local area and thus convenient, or who may be paid for by the surgeon to refer you. Never listen to recommendations from anyone who is an “armchair expert” or who has no in-depth knowledge of breast augmentation.

At the end of the day, look at the plastic surgeon’s results to see how good they are. Be very careful with “glamour shots” that can deceive because of lighting, patient positioning and camera angle. They may even be “photo-shopped” or airbrushed. Some plastic surgeons may have models as patients that they have operated on their face but not their breasts (which was performed by another surgeon) and use them for advertising breast augmentation.

There are a further number of “red flags” that you should take notice of. These are:

1)  Completed training in a specialty other than plastic surgery

2)  Certified in an unrelated college

3)  Not a member of ASPS and ASAPS

4)  No hospital privileges

5)  If you are given false or misleading information – claims that are too good to be true.

6)  Unwilling to provide you answers to questions regarding credentials or their curriculum vitae

7)  When the office staff are not courteous, knowledgeable, or don’t spend enough time with you, and don’t tell you what you need to know. Beware of staff who give you all fluff, but no substance, and don’t offer to send you any information. Always insist that the price is broken down into the following categories: surgeon fees, anaesthetist fees, costs of implants, operating room fees, hospital stay fees, laboratory fees, mammogram or ultrasound fees, any other fees. Ask how long the prices on the quote last for. Remember, there is no such thing as bargain surgery. Have you ever seen top-quality surgery for a bargain price? How is the bargain surgeon able to offer such a good price?

When visiting the plastic surgeon’s rooms, look around and take notice of the little things. It should be a quiet, comfortable and modern, an atmosphere that reflects the good taste of the plastic surgeon. The organisation, function, and flow of the plastic surgeon’s office is a reflection of the surgeon’s personality and habits. Think about it. If the office looks messy and unclean, doesn’t that reflect badly on the surgeon who accepts this scenario?

Most of the time, you will recognise a good plastic surgeon without the surgeon having to tell you. If they have integrity, are caring and thorough, then this will definitely contribute to what you will get in the operating room and after.

Question:  What factors do you consider important when choosing a plastic surgeon to perform a breast augmentation? You can leave a comment below.

Brazilian butt lift surgery task force set up after alarming death rate

A DANGEROUS butt procedure has a higher death rate than any other and Aussie women are being warned to think carefully before committing to it.

A NOTORIOUS surgical procedure, known as the Brazilian Butt Lift, is now considered so dangerous that a specialist Aussie task force has been set up to warn women of its risks.

Inspired by “bootylicious” celebrities and social media stars such as the Kardashians, Jennifer Lopez and Beyonce, the risky operation has raised alarms after a number of complications and number of deaths.

BBL is the colloquial term for buttock fat grafting, an elective cosmetic procedure which can cost up to $14,000 and involves removing fat from one part of the body via liposuction and transplanting it via injection into the butt for a fuller, perkier effect.

According to the Australasian Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (ASAPS), the mortality rate for BBLs is estimated to be one in every 3000 operations — meaning it has a higher rate of death than any other cosmetic procedure.

THE BOOTYLICIOUS EFFECT

The BBL’s popularity has increased over the last few years, with the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery tracking a 26 percent jump from 2016 to 2017, making it the surgical procedure that saw the second most significant increase performed year over year.

However, its complications have thrust it into the medical spotlight and plastic surgeons across the world have expressed deep concerns over its increasing popularity.

ASAPS has now backed a new “patient safety task force” to investigate the risks and improve patient safety of the increasingly popular procedure in Australia.

“In short, the butt is becoming the new breast,” Dr Tim Papadopoulos, specialist plastic surgeon and past president of ASAPS said.

Kim Kardashian has always denied having a BBL procedure. Picture: Mega Agency
Kim Kardashian has always denied having a BBL procedure. Picture: Mega Agency Source: Mega
‘Bootylicious’ singer Beyonce is an inspiration for many young women. Picture: Mega Agency
‘Bootylicious’ singer Beyonce is an inspiration for many young women. Picture: Mega Agency Source: Mega

Five of the world’s leading plastic and cosmetic surgery-related organisations have banded together to form an “Inter-Society Buttock Fat Grafting Task Force” to research complications and deaths associated with BBL.

“Action must be taken now in order to prevent further tragedies from occurring,” Dr Papadopoulos said.

“The task force is concerned with the high mortality rate of this operation and is aggressively investigating ways to make this procedure safer.

“This new warning emphasises the continued risk that is being encountered with this procedure. Patient safety is the highest priority for plastic surgeons and this multi-society task force is an important and unprecedented collaboration.”

He said the procedure had resulted in an “alarming rate of mortality”.

“This rate of death is far greater than any other cosmetic surgery,” he said. “Having said that, there has been no reported case of a death from BBL in Australasia.”

He this may be due to the cultural and ethnic differences and perceptions of beauty regarding bums.

“Although social media has had a huge influence in promoting BBL, especially with celebrities like Kim Kardashian and Jennifer Lopez, the volumes of buttock fat transfer overseas don’t necessarily translate to what’s going on here in Australia,” Dr Papadopoulos said.

The surgery can cost up to $14,000. Picture: Supplied/ Cosmos Clinic website
The surgery can cost up to $14,000. Picture: Supplied/ Cosmos Clinic website Source: Supplied

“In the USA, the large African-American and Hispanic populations have generally dictated their beauty norms which promote larger backsides and smaller breasts.

“This is not the case in Australia where women generally prefer larger breasts and smaller backsides.”

WHAT THE TASK FORCE WILL DO

The task force will examine the causes behind complications and deaths to try to prevent them from occurring through a variety of doctor and patient safety education measures, including unprecedented research.

Once those results are finalised, a comprehensive set of guidelines for the procedure will be submitted for publication in major clinical journals.

“Interestingly, while this procedure has been done for decades, it wasn’t recognised as risky until recently,” Dr Papadopoulos said.

The alarm bells started to ring for some surgeons after a 2015 study which looked at 19 BBL-related deaths in Colombia and Mexico over a 15-year period.

A 2017 report also noted at least 25 fatalities in the United States in the preceding five years.

WHY IS THE BBL SO DANGEROUS?

Dr Papadopoulos says every BBL-related death is caused by bits of fat (or “emboli-globules”) which enter the blood stream and clog up the patient’s heart.

“The cause of death is emboli-globules of fat that inadvertently enter the gluteal veins and swiftly make their way up to the heart and lungs, causing patients to arrest and die usually in the operating room during the procedure or in the recovery room shortly after,” Dr Papadopoulos said.

Tim Papadopoulos said women should research the procedure carefully.
Tim Papadopoulos said women should research the procedure carefully. Source: News Corp Australia

“These emboli are unique to the buttock area, as fat injections in the breast, face and thighs don’t produce this same phenomenon.

“The gluteal veins’ distinctive anatomy makes them especially vulnerable because they’re very big and thin, and only one tributary away from the inferior vena cava, which is the major vein in the body running from the pelvis to the heart.

“If a surgeon nicks one of these gluteal veins or they tear because of traction from pooling of fat beneath the muscle, it’ll act like a siphon, sucking in fat around it, and ultimately sending fat up into the heart.”

WHAT TO DO IF YOU WANT A BBL

Dr Papadopoulos said any patients interested in the procedure should research and trust only FRACS-qualified Specialist Plastic Surgeons at accredited and licensed facilities or hospitals. “You should ask to see before-and-after photos and ask for patient references,” he said.

“You, too, should stay informed on the issue, and when consulting with doctors, don’t hesitate to question their approach.”

To find a suitable surgeon search through the Australasian Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons Member Database.

– Ben Graham 

Article Source: news.com.au

Avoiding Difficult Patients

As a cosmetic plastic surgeon,  I try and avoid the potential wrath of a disgruntled cosmetic surgery patient.  I do this by trying to predict who will not be a “good”  post-operative patient.  The key is the initial interview which is used as an effective screening process to pick out the patient with inappropriate motivation,  unrealistic expectations or those obsessed with imagined physical defects.  I then simply do not operate on these patients who  “fail” the screening.  Certain  patient  types  to  interview  carefully  before making  the  final  decision  on  whether  to  operate  or  not  include:

  • Patients whom my staff or I don’t ”gel with”for some reason. Initial “gut instincts” may be correct.
  • Perfectionists: Those seeking a flawless result, cannot accept minor asymmetries or slight imperfections after surgery.  They have the potential to be unrealistic patients.
  • Dissatisfied patients: Some of these were dissatisfied with previous cosmetic surgery by another surgeon. She or he wants me to  “fix it”.  They often put you on a lofty pedestal ready for when they fall when things don’t work out so well.
  • VIPs: Someone highly visible to the public, such as actors,  TV personalities, and politicians, have bigger stakes.

Research shows that a small percentage of cosmetic surgery patients are at risk of experiencing psychological problems, such as depression, after undergoing elective surgery.  Some of these patients sue, harass and even threaten the doctor who performed their surgery.  It ’s important then for every patient to get it straight with their surgeon as to whether they have a policy about who pays for revisions when necessary and to make sure the policy ’s provisions are clear before surgery.

Thanks for reading!

Dr.  Tim  –  Sydney  Cosmetic  Plastic  Surgeon

www.cosmeticculture.com.au
www.drtim.com.au

Teenage Cosmetic Surgery: Why So Much Pressure?

 

There has been a storm brewing for some me now regarding teenage cosmetic surgery.  A concoction made up of quick fixes,  a society obsessed with beauty, and the commercialisation and overexposure of cosmetic surgery. This has all lent themselves to the growth of cosmetic surgery for  Generation  X and younger.  This has been further compounded by the increasing number of medical specialists entering the cosmetic arena.

My worry is that this Generation X and their successors wanting teenage cosmetic surgery may become an abused marketplace.  It would appear that they have it a little easier, in the sense that, they have parents or relatives who have had cosmetic surgery and are approving of it, in an economy that has been both buoyant and robust for some time now.  This takes away from the fact, that teenage cosmetic surgery needs much more scrutiny because it can play on people’s insecurities and promises of an instantly better life.

Most plastic surgeons I believe are responsible individuals with a conscience who try and counsel teenagers, usually in front of their parents, of the risks, benefits, and outcomes of procedures, as well as whether they are appropriate or not. They try very hard to show that TV programs like Extreme Makeover,  Dr.  90210  and  The Swan trivialise and glamourise cosmetic surgery and that glossy magazines like Teen Vogue or Teen Cosmo display airbrushed photos of models and celebrities that are in reality unachievable.

Now teenagers who want to have cosmetic surgery usually have different motivations and goals than adults.  They too have cosmetic surgery to improve physical characteristics they feel are awkward or flawed,  that if left uncorrected, may affect them well into adulthood.  Teens tend to have cosmetic surgery to fit in with peers, to look similar.  Adults tend to have cosmetic surgery to stand out from others.  Teenagers frequently gain self-esteem and confidence when their physical problems are corrected.  In fact, successful teenage cosmetic surgery may reverse the social withdrawal that generally accompanies teenagers who feel different.  Not every teenager seeking cosmetic surgery is well suited for an operation.  Teenagers must demonstrate emotional maturity and an understanding of the limitations of cosmetic surgery.

I would caution teenagers and parents to keep in mind that cosmetic surgery is real surgery, with great benefits, but also carries some risks. Teenagers should have realistic expectations about cosmetic surgery and what it can do for them. In addition, certain milestones in growth and physical maturity must be achieved before undergoing cosmetic surgery. The most rewarding outcomes are expected when the following exist:

  1. The teenager initiates the request.
    The young person must appreciate both the benefits and limitations of cosmetic surgery, avoiding unrealistic expectations about life changes that will occur as a result of the procedure.
  2. The teenager has realistic goals.
    While parental support isn’t lessened at all, the teenager’s own desire for cosmetic surgery must be clearly expressed and repeated over a period of time.
  3.  The teenager has sufficient maturity.
    Teenagers must be able to tolerate the discomfort and temporary disfigurement of a surgical procedure.  Cosmetic surgery is not recommended for teens who are prone to mood swings or erratic behavior, who are abusing drugs and/ or alcohol, or who are being treated for clinical depression or other mental illness.

Some of the commonest teenage cosmetic surgery procedures include:

  1. Rhinoplasty (nose reshaping)

Cosmetic surgery may be performed on the nose to straighten the bridge, remove an unsightly hump, reshape the point or open breathing passages. Ordinarily, this is not performed until the nose reaches its adult size –  about age 15 or 16 in girls and a year later in boys. The procedure accounted for nearly 50 percent of all cosmetic surgical procedures performed on this age group.

2.Otoplasty (ear surgery)

Surgical correction of protruding ears, in which the ears are pinned back, may be performed any time after the age of five. Otoplasty made up 11 percent of all cosmetic surgical procedures performed on this age group.

3. Correction of Breast Asymmetry

When one breast grows to a much larger size than the other, an operation may correct the difference by reducing the larger breast, augmenting the smaller, or both. Many teenagers who want breast augmentation tend to have one breast that is larger than the other – sometimes a full cup size or more in difference. This condition is called breast asymmetry. Using a breast implant in the smaller breast allows the patient to have breasts of the same size. Although waiting may prolong the physical awkwardness, it is advisable to delay surgery until breast growth ceases in order to achieve the best result.

4. Breast Augmentation

Breast implants can be used for breast augmentation in women 18-years or older and for breast reconstruction.

Many teenagers who want breast augmentation to have one breast that is larger than the other -sometimes a full cup size or more in difference. This condition is called breast asymmetry. Using a breast implant in the smaller breast allows the patient to have breasts of the same size. Although waiting may prolong the physical awkwardness, it is advisable to delay surgery until breast growth ceases in order to achieve the best result.

5. Breast Reduction

Surgical reduction of very large breasts can overcome both physical and psychological burdens for a teenage girl.

In fact, many teenagers suffer ongoing back pain due to overly large breasts. Although waiting may prolong the psychological awkwardness, it is advisable to delay surgery until breast growth ceases in order to achieve the best result.

6. Acne and Acne Scar Treatment

Acne eruptions may be controlled by the proper use of modern prescription drugs. In addition to supervising the use of these medications, plastic surgeons may improve acne scars by smoothing or “refinishing” the skin with a laser or with a fine sanding technique called microdermabrasion. Other treatments for acne related skin problems include laser skin resurfacing, dermabrasion, and chemical peels.

7. Male Breast Reduction (Gynaecomastia)

Teenage boys with large breasts, known as gynecomastia, are often eager to undergo plastic surgery. Surgical correction can be accomplished in a variety of ways including liposuction and/or surgical excision of the breast tissue.

As a plastic surgeon, I am an advocate for the right teenage cosmetic surgery, at the right time, and for the right reason. Things like correction of prominent ears, breast reduction in adolescent boys or breast reconstruction in young girls with an underdeveloped breast can truly advance the person’s quality of life. It is our responsibility as plastic surgeons to guide teenagers (and their parents) in the right direction and to educate them that cosmetic surgery is not a panacea for the everyday pressures that teenagers’ face. Cosmetic surgery can make you more attractive but not necessarily happier!

Question: What do you think is the commonest reason teenagers want cosmetic surgery? You can leave a comment below.