How Do You Repair Torn Earlobes?

The earlobes are the lowest part of the ears made of skin and a small amount of fatty tissue in between. There are large variations in size, form, and shape. The earlobes serve women (and men) as popular locations for placing jewellery. Often, the earlobes are pierced to fit various forms of ear ornaments ranging from studs to earrings which can occasionally set them up for trouble.

Excessive weight or trauma can easily overcome the strength of the earlobe tissues leading to a tear, which if complete, results in a split ear. Some people with rather thin earlobes who favour wearing heavy earrings, experience a gradual elongation of the ear-piercing tract such that it becomes slit-like and often too large. Another problem is that the earlobes can be torn by accidental trauma. This split may be unattractive and renders the earlobe unusable for most jewellery. Sometimes, clip-on earrings can still be fitted and are used to camouflage the earlobe tear.

The repair of torn earlobes is relatively simple. The procedure is routinely performed in the office under local anaesthesia with an optional sedative. After planning and marking, a small amount of lignocaine numbing solution is deposited. I favour a three-layer repair done under loupe magnification. But it is very important to remove the damaged ear-piercing tract or to trim the edges of the split if the earlobe has been torn through completely.

Then the three-layer closure consists of closing the outer layer of skin, the fatty tissue between the two layers of the skin and finally the skin in the back of the earlobe. Typically, the surgeon must take great pains to avoid any notching at the bottom of the earlobe. The fine sutures on the skin are usually removed within 7 days. Small amounts of antibiotic ointment are applied at home for a few days ensuring cleanliness. The healed earlobe has usually a barely visible pencil-fine straight or zigzag scar line.

People often ask if the ears can be pierced again. They can but typically you should wait three months after the earlobe has been repaired. Preferably piercing should not be done within the scar, as this can stretch and inevitably result in another clot.

Thanks for reading!

Dr. Tim – Sydney Cosmetic Plastic Surgeon

www.cosmeticculture.com.au
www.drtim.com.au

Supplements and Cosmetic Surgery

Herbal supplements and vitamins are known to have a significant and measurable effect on promoting wound healing, reducing bruising,  enhancing immunity, and reducing oxidation caused by both surgery and anaesthetic drugs. However, these supplements are still drugs that could cause dangerous side effects during cosmetic surgery. About 50% of cosmetic surgery patients take supplements (usually more than one), but often do not tell their surgeons because they assume they are safe.  Some  of  the  most  popular  herbal  supplements  taken  are  chondroitin,  echinacea, and  glucosamine:

  • Chondroitin is often used to treat osteoarthritis.  People using chondroitin may suffer from bleeding complications during surgery, particularly when used in combination with doctor-prescribed blood-thinning medications (like warfarin).
  • Echinacea is often used for the prevention and treatment of viral, bacterial and fungal infections, as well as chronic wounds, ulcers, and arthritis.  However, it can trigger immunosuppression, causing poor wound healing and infection.
  • Glucosamine, often offered in conjunction with chondroitin, contains chemical elements that mimic human insulin, and may artificially cause low blood sugars during surgery.

Other common supplements taken by patients that may cause thinning of the blood are the “4  Gs”  (gingko biloba, garlicginseng, and ginger), fish oils and Vitamin E.

Cosmetic surgery should be viewed with the same care and concern as heart or brain surgery. Everything we do is important for our patients, so every precaution and safety should be taken to minimise complications from surgery and anaesthesia. Remember, we need your help and cooperation at all times.  Advise us of every drug you take, prescribed and non-prescribed and cease taking any blood thinning agents 2 weeks prior to surgery unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

Thanks for reading!

Dr. Tim  –  Sydney  Cosmetic  Plastic  Surgeon

www.cosmeticculture.com.au
www.drtim.com.au

Wabi-Sabi In Cosmetic Surgery – Imperfect, Impermanent, and Incomplete.

Celebrities, models, and socialites have highlighted some severe complications (including death) from undergoing cosmetic surgery in their pursuit of perfection. This is very concerning and makes me reflect on what beauty is all about. I am reminded at this point of Wabi-Sabi, the Japanese philosophy that embraces the beauty of things imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete.

It is a beauty of things modest and humble. It would be interesting to see how much of this ancient Japanese philosophy could be embraced in the world of cosmetic surgery and what a difference it could make.

Wabi-Sabi represents the exact opposite of the Western ideal of great beauty as something symmetrical, extraordinary and enduring. Wabi-Sabi is about the minor and the hidden, the tentative and the ephemeral: things so subtle and evanescent they are invisible to unrefined eyes.

Simplicity is at the core of things Wabi-Sabi. Wabi-Sabi embraces the “less is more” ideal talked about today, yet often ignored. Cosmetic surgery needs a lot of Wabi-Sabi.

Thanks for reading!

Dr.  Tim  –  Sydney  Cosmetic  Plastic  Surgeon

www.cosmeticculture.com.au
www.drtim.com.au