3 Tips to Consider Before Body Lift Surgery

Body lift surgery is a complex operation that requires a lot of information to be processed and considered. There are 3 main points that people interested in this procedure should keep in mind especially that this involved both a major physical and psychological recovery period.

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1. Make Sure You Have Appropriate Motivation & Realistic Expectations

Make sure you are doing the body lift surgery for yourself and for the right reasons and that you have realistic expectations.  Be aware that an improvement in the problem area may not necessarily translate to an overall improvement in your life or home situation.  You are bound to be disappointed with results of body lift surgery if your motivation is not intrinsic.
 Timing of your body lift surgery is crucial. Generally, it is not a good idea to have body lift surgery done during or immediately after a stressful period in your life e.g. divorce or death of a loved one. The additional stress of body lift surgery will undoubtedly be  more challenging to deal with if your emotional reserves are already exhausted. Take note that an improvement in your physical appearance will not necessarily translate to an improvement in your life situation.
 Lastly, keep in mind the end results as you go through the sometimes tough, emotional times after your body lift surgery.

What Is a Mummy Makeover?

Many of today’s mums don’t feel they should sacrifice the way they look just because they’ve had children. After multiple pregnancies and breastfeeding, many women find it impossible for diet and exercise alone to restore their figures. These women usually want their tummies and breasts back the way they looked before pregnancy.

These so-called “Mummy Makeovers” are usually performed on women in their 30s or early 40s. There are multiple variations of the Mummy Makeover, of course, and I individualise the plan for each patient depending on their needs. Many women will not need or desire all of these procedures. Each patient determines what her personal Mummy Makeover will involve after we discuss her concerns and options in a thorough consultation.

A Mummy Makeover may be performed in one or more stages. Age, health, needs, and desires are all considered carefully when I formulate a plan for each patient. The majority of my patients choose to do more than one procedure at a time. I’ve had a great deal of experience performing these combined surgeries over the past decade. We take many steps to assure both minimal pain and maximum safety during our procedures:

  1. TUMMY TUCK: The tummy tends to experience the greatest change following pregnancy with stretch marks, loose skin and lower tummy fat being the most common complaints. The tummy muscles may also be stretched to the point that they remain separated in the midline, accentuating the patient’s lower tummy bulge. To treat these problems, I perform a tummy tuck where I remove the excess skin and fat from the tummy and tighten the muscles. Whenever we do a tummy tuck as part of the Mummy Makeover, we perform liposuction and pay special on to the belly button to help create a nice looking midriff.
  2. LIPOSUCTION: After having children, fat tends to redistribute to new areas on the body where it may be unwanted. This is frequently true even if women are successful at losing their baby weight. Most often, bulges of fat accumulated around the waist and on the thighs. On these areas, I frequently perform liposuction as part of a Mummy Makeover.
  3. BREAST SURGERY: The breasts go through dramatic changes with pregnancy and breastfeeding. Patient concerns about their breasts vary greatly, but the most common breast procedures I perform as part of a Mummy Makeover include:

Many of our patients for the Mummy Makeover travel from places outside of Sydney. Our staff can help with the planning of these sorts of trips through our CosmeticCulture Makeover Vacation Program, which makes travel for cosmetic surgery quite easy. More information is available on our website www.cosmeticculture.com.au, including descriptions of tummy tuck and breast augmentation or breast lifts as well as liposuction. You can also email us for more information at info@drtim.com.au or call us at 13000DRTIM.

Question:  Which parts of your post-childbirth body would you like to change with a Mummy Makeover? You can leave a comment below.

Download FREE Mommy Makeover Guide now!

Are you frustrated with unwanted, loose, stretched skin following pregnancy?  Tummy muscles that have lost their tone causing you to have a round belly? Sagging breasts that have lost their volume and shape?AUGMENTATION MASTOPEXY ABDOMINOPLASTY IMAGE.001Mothers dedicate a great deal of themselves to their families. It starts with the pregnancy, where the mother’s body changes dramatically. Finally, there comes a time when mothers feel they’re able to address their own needs. After multiple pregnancies and breastfeeding, many women find it impossible for diet and exercise alone to restore their figures. Fortunately, mothers with permanently altered figures find that a Mommy Makeover is an excellent solution. A Mommy Makeover refers to the common group of procedures (like abdominoplasty and breast lift) that many mothers seek after they are finished having children. Many times, the operation is performed in one stage, but other moms will prefer to do the procedures over time. In either case, it gives many mothers comfort to know that the changes they see in their bodies following pregnancy may be improved dramatically by a skilled plastic surgeon.

I’ve just put together a step-by-step guide called the “Mommy Makeover: Get Your Pre-baby Body Back! To learn how to remove unwanted abdominal skin and tone your tummy muscles, make your breasts perky and youthful again, download this PDF file now!

Fill out the details below to learn more:


To learn more about what a Mommy Makeover can do for you, request a consultation with DrTim by calling us at 13000DRTIM .

Breast Lift and Augmentation: The facts you need to know!

The goals of breast lift with or without breast augmentation are to restore shape, volume, and nipple-areola position. However, simultaneous breast lift and augmentation present multiple problems, specifically because it becomes harder to control all of the variables affecting the outcome when combining the two procedures. No single method is best to treat all types of sagging (ptosis), and maintaining a good blood supply to the nipple-areola complex is of paramount importance, so a staged procedure may be necessary at times.

Why is combining a breast lift and breast augmentation the most difficult of all cosmetic breast surgery procedures? The surgery involves manoeuvres that can be counterproductive to each other since the skin is being removed and when closed back up again, pushes the breast in and upwards, whilst an implant stretches the skin in an out and in a downwards direction. These conflicting tensions can adversely affect the blood supply to the breast and skin which may affect wound healing, scar quality etc. Positioning of both the nipple and breast fold also becomes more challenging during simultaneous lift and augmentation. Secondly, no two breasts are the same, and each patient is seeking a different endpoint, sometimes with unrealistic expectations.

The first thing that I do when evaluating a patient for a breast lift is to ask them if they are happy with their present breast volume. You can simply do this by pinching the skin below the breast and pushing it up where it belongs. Most women are amazed at how little of breast volume they actually have. If that is the case, then volume enhancement, usually with an implant, is necessary along with a lift. If the volume is satisfactory, then a breast lift will suffice.

The second thing to do is grade the amount of breast sagging. This is done by using Regnault’s classification which looks at the position of the nipple as follows:

1)  Grade 1 (minor): nipple at breast fold
2)  Grade 2 (moderate): nipple is below the fold but above the lower breast contour
3)  Grade 3 (major): nipple is below the fold and below breast contour
4)  Pseudoptosis (“false sagging”): nipple lies above the fold, there is little breast volume, some of which lies below the fold

Other characteristics that one looks out for are:

1) Skin: elasticity and excess;
2)  Breast tissue:  firm and fibrous or soft and fatty; and
3)  Skin-breast tissue relationship: firm and adherent or loosely adherent and is the breast full or empty. Skin quality and the skin-breast tissue relationship are the key factors in determining the breast lift procedure and the quality and longevity of the final result.

As a general rule, if the skin elasticity is normal, the breast envelope is full, and the skin is adherent to the underlying breast tissue, then the scars would be limited, and vice versa. In other words, one progresses from limited scars such as periareolar scars (scars around the nipple-areola complex) to periareolar-vertical scars (scars that run down the front of the breast below the nipple-areola complex) to more extensive, full-length inverted-T or anchor scars.

For the patient with “pseudoptosis,” inserting a breast implant alone, usually tear-dropped shaped, is typically all that is needed. For Grade I sagging, an implant alone or a lift plus an implant may be required.

Depending on a number of factors, the lift may be performed via a crescent, periareolar, or vertical approach. A vertical approach is preferred if there is significant looseness below the nipple. However, the periareolar incision is generally used in just a few specific situations. Since this skin-only incision is unable to lift much weight, it is an option in women with small breasts who need only a small amount of nipple repositioning, usually < 2 cm.

In addition, it is considered advantageous in women with pointed, conical or tubular breasts, because it causes areolar flattening and eliminates the tubular nature. The main issue I have with performing a periareolar breast lift is its tendency to cause areolar flattening and leave the areola more prone to stretching.

In Grade 2 sagging, especially where the breasts are large and heavy, a vertical breast lift is often required because it will effectively lift the breast tissue to achieve increased projection. However, a periareolar incision may still be considered for women with light breasts. When performing a vertical breast lift, the procedure may be converted into a short inverted-T lift if a difficulty is encountered controlling the nipple-to-breast fold distance.

With Grade 3 sagging, the lift technique depends on the nipple-to-breast fold distance. If it is > 10 cm, most surgeons perform an inverted-T breast lift. Otherwise, vertical breast lift remains an option that will enable control of the nipple-to-breast fold distance, as the vertical scar tends to shorten in the post-operative period with scar contraction.

Thanks for reading!

Dr. Tim – Sydney Cosmetic Plastic Surgeon

www.cosmeticculture.com.au
www.drtim.com.au

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An abdominoplasty (tummy tuck) procedure involves the following steps:

  1. Removing a large amount of lower abdominal skin (and stretch marks)
  2. Removing a large amount of lower abdominal fat
  3. Tightening the rectus abdominis muscles of the abdomen
  4. Redistributing the upper abdominal skin over the entire abdomen
  5. Creating a new belly button within the tightened abdominal skin
  6. Tightening the pubic area

To learn more about abdominoplasty (tummy tuck), request a consultation by contacting us at 13000DRTIM or emailing us at info@drtim.com.au 

 

Brazilian butt lift surgery task force set up after alarming death rate

A DANGEROUS butt procedure has a higher death rate than any other and Aussie women are being warned to think carefully before committing to it.

A NOTORIOUS surgical procedure, known as the Brazilian Butt Lift, is now considered so dangerous that a specialist Aussie task force has been set up to warn women of its risks.

Inspired by “bootylicious” celebrities and social media stars such as the Kardashians, Jennifer Lopez and Beyonce, the risky operation has raised alarms after a number of complications and number of deaths.

BBL is the colloquial term for buttock fat grafting, an elective cosmetic procedure which can cost up to $14,000 and involves removing fat from one part of the body via liposuction and transplanting it via injection into the butt for a fuller, perkier effect.

According to the Australasian Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (ASAPS), the mortality rate for BBLs is estimated to be one in every 3000 operations — meaning it has a higher rate of death than any other cosmetic procedure.

THE BOOTYLICIOUS EFFECT

The BBL’s popularity has increased over the last few years, with the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery tracking a 26 percent jump from 2016 to 2017, making it the surgical procedure that saw the second most significant increase performed year over year.

However, its complications have thrust it into the medical spotlight and plastic surgeons across the world have expressed deep concerns over its increasing popularity.

ASAPS has now backed a new “patient safety task force” to investigate the risks and improve patient safety of the increasingly popular procedure in Australia.

“In short, the butt is becoming the new breast,” Dr Tim Papadopoulos, specialist plastic surgeon and past president of ASAPS said.

Kim Kardashian has always denied having a BBL procedure. Picture: Mega Agency
Kim Kardashian has always denied having a BBL procedure. Picture: Mega Agency Source: Mega
‘Bootylicious’ singer Beyonce is an inspiration for many young women. Picture: Mega Agency
‘Bootylicious’ singer Beyonce is an inspiration for many young women. Picture: Mega Agency Source: Mega

Five of the world’s leading plastic and cosmetic surgery-related organisations have banded together to form an “Inter-Society Buttock Fat Grafting Task Force” to research complications and deaths associated with BBL.

“Action must be taken now in order to prevent further tragedies from occurring,” Dr Papadopoulos said.

“The task force is concerned with the high mortality rate of this operation and is aggressively investigating ways to make this procedure safer.

“This new warning emphasises the continued risk that is being encountered with this procedure. Patient safety is the highest priority for plastic surgeons and this multi-society task force is an important and unprecedented collaboration.”

He said the procedure had resulted in an “alarming rate of mortality”.

“This rate of death is far greater than any other cosmetic surgery,” he said. “Having said that, there has been no reported case of a death from BBL in Australasia.”

He this may be due to the cultural and ethnic differences and perceptions of beauty regarding bums.

“Although social media has had a huge influence in promoting BBL, especially with celebrities like Kim Kardashian and Jennifer Lopez, the volumes of buttock fat transfer overseas don’t necessarily translate to what’s going on here in Australia,” Dr Papadopoulos said.

The surgery can cost up to $14,000. Picture: Supplied/ Cosmos Clinic website
The surgery can cost up to $14,000. Picture: Supplied/ Cosmos Clinic website Source: Supplied

“In the USA, the large African-American and Hispanic populations have generally dictated their beauty norms which promote larger backsides and smaller breasts.

“This is not the case in Australia where women generally prefer larger breasts and smaller backsides.”

WHAT THE TASK FORCE WILL DO

The task force will examine the causes behind complications and deaths to try to prevent them from occurring through a variety of doctor and patient safety education measures, including unprecedented research.

Once those results are finalised, a comprehensive set of guidelines for the procedure will be submitted for publication in major clinical journals.

“Interestingly, while this procedure has been done for decades, it wasn’t recognised as risky until recently,” Dr Papadopoulos said.

The alarm bells started to ring for some surgeons after a 2015 study which looked at 19 BBL-related deaths in Colombia and Mexico over a 15-year period.

A 2017 report also noted at least 25 fatalities in the United States in the preceding five years.

WHY IS THE BBL SO DANGEROUS?

Dr Papadopoulos says every BBL-related death is caused by bits of fat (or “emboli-globules”) which enter the blood stream and clog up the patient’s heart.

“The cause of death is emboli-globules of fat that inadvertently enter the gluteal veins and swiftly make their way up to the heart and lungs, causing patients to arrest and die usually in the operating room during the procedure or in the recovery room shortly after,” Dr Papadopoulos said.

Tim Papadopoulos said women should research the procedure carefully.
Tim Papadopoulos said women should research the procedure carefully. Source: News Corp Australia

“These emboli are unique to the buttock area, as fat injections in the breast, face and thighs don’t produce this same phenomenon.

“The gluteal veins’ distinctive anatomy makes them especially vulnerable because they’re very big and thin, and only one tributary away from the inferior vena cava, which is the major vein in the body running from the pelvis to the heart.

“If a surgeon nicks one of these gluteal veins or they tear because of traction from pooling of fat beneath the muscle, it’ll act like a siphon, sucking in fat around it, and ultimately sending fat up into the heart.”

WHAT TO DO IF YOU WANT A BBL

Dr Papadopoulos said any patients interested in the procedure should research and trust only FRACS-qualified Specialist Plastic Surgeons at accredited and licensed facilities or hospitals. “You should ask to see before-and-after photos and ask for patient references,” he said.

“You, too, should stay informed on the issue, and when consulting with doctors, don’t hesitate to question their approach.”

To find a suitable surgeon search through the Australasian Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons Member Database.

– Ben Graham 

Article Source: news.com.au

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Candidates for an abdominoplasty (tummy tuck) have some or all of the following problems:

  1. Loose skin on the lower abdomen
  2. Stretch marks on the lower abdominal
  3. Abdominal muscle laxity
  4. Pubic laxity

Good abdominoplasty candidates should be healthy non-smokers. Avoiding smoking is important to decrease risks. Although it’s better for patients to be near their ideal weight, many patients who are overweight are still good candidates for the procedure.

To learn more about abdominoplasty (tummy tuck), request a consultation by contacting us at 13000DRTIM or emailing us at info@drtim.com.au 

Tummy Tuck: 3 essential things you must know!

  1. Before a tummy tuck

When you continually gain and lose weight, the excess tissue composed of skin and fat in the lower part of the tummy becomes a real problem for some people. This excess tissue along with the underlying lax muscles can be dealt with by a surgical procedure known as a tummy tuck, otherwise known as an abdominoplasty. Removing the “muffin top” (the tissues between the belly button and pubis), then re-draping the skin from above the belly button to meet the skin on the pubis and repositioning the belly button, are the basis of all tummy tucks.

One of the keys to a tummy tuck is finding out how much excess skin and fat, as well as, muscle laxity you have in your tummy, is to bend over at the waist and “let it all hang out.” The next step is to pinch these tissues and tighten the tummy muscles, which will give you an idea of how much of the tissues need to be removed.x

Also, you will notice that most of the tissue bulk is in the midline and fades out at the sides. If you imagine this excess tissue as an ellipse on the lower tummy, it will give you an indication of how long the scar will be from one side of the hip to the other. I tell all my patients that the resulting scar can be concealed, that it will generally fade with time, but will always be there.

 

  1. Tummy tuck operation

Just prior to beginning the tummy tuck, I mark the tummy while the patient is standing up. I mark the midline from the xiphoid (“breast bone”) to the pubis. This enables me to realign the midline after removing the excess tissues and to place the belly button in the midline. A second line indicates the position of the lower-tummy incision. This usually lies quite low in the tummy since the most common garment worn by women today is jeans. Finally, areas for liposuction are marked in the upper tummy, the hips and lower flanks (liposuction thins the tissues and allows them to re-drape better).

Our anaesthetists use a laryngeal-mask airway (a breathing tube that sits at the back of the throat) and do not paralyse the patient, allowing them to breathe independently during the entire operation. I begin the tummy tuck operation with liposuction to the tummy, hips and lower flanks.  Then, I incise the skin around the belly button which is still attached to the underlying muscle wall. After making the lower tummy incision, I widely undermine the tissue up to the level of the belly button. I continue the dissection above the belly button to the level of the xiphoid process (lower part of the sternum), making a central tunnel (about the size of a hands width). I then “lace-up” the separated muscles of the midline from above and below the belly button.

Next, the patient is bent at the waist to 45 degrees, and the excess tissues removed so that the two skin edges may be closed without tension. Two drains are brought out below the pubic hairline to capture any excess fluid that may build-up in the tissues. These usually are taken out between day 3 to 5 when the drainage is less than 30 ml’s or so. Lastly, I bring out the belly button at the midline, usually 12 to 15 cm above the lower tummy incision and place a tummy binder on the patient at this time and adjust it to allow for moderate compression.

The patient is kept in a bent position at the waist and knees as they are transferred to the recovery bed.

 

  1. After tummy tuck surgery

After a tummy tuck, the patient will continue to wear TED (compression) stockings and automated calf compressors for 24-48 hours and be commenced on blood thinning agents the following day to lessen the chance of deep vein thrombosis (clots in the legs) or pulmonary embolism (when these clots break away from the legs and migrate through the venous system to the lungs causing a “lung attack”).

The patient is instructed to sleep with several pillows behind her back and a pillow beneath their knees.

They are encouraged to walk to the bathroom the following day, have showers and to undergo regular chest physiotherapy. Patients are advised to wear the tummy binder continuously for the first 4 weeks after surgery, except when they wash themselves or the binder. After this period, I allow them to wear it only at night if they wish, but many choose to wear it longer. I also advise patients that it takes 4 weeks to get back to normal activities of daily living and 6 weeks to resume aerobics exercises.

 

Question: What questions do you have about tummy tuck surgery? You can leave a comment below.

 

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Body lifts can be performed in two different ways, to treat either the upper or the lower body:

  • Lower body lift: The lower body lift is the most common type of body lift in my practice. It typically includes a tummy tuck (abdominoplasty), thigh lift and buttocks lift performed at the same time. The incision is concealed around the waistline so that it’s not visible when wearing underwear or a bikini.
  • Upper body lift: For patients with severe skin laxity of the upper torso, an upper body lift may be the appropriate treatment. This typically includes a bra line back lift and upper abdominoplasty. The procedure is individualised for the particular patient.

To learn more about body lifts, request a consultation by contacting us at 13000DRTIM or emailing us at info@drtim.com.au 

Laser Hair Removal Mythconceptions

There is no such thing as a single “best” laser for hair removal on all patients.  The best laser for laser hair removal for each person really depends on his or her skin colour. Thus, multiple lasers exist for hair removal. Different laser types, which emit distinct wavelengths of light, are better for treating different skin types. There are a number of manufacturers that make these laser types:

  • Alexandrite lasers. These emit laser light at 755 nm. These lasers work best on lighter skin. In my opinion,  it has been the most impressive laser for hair removal for light to olive skin types.
  • Diode Lasers.  These emit light at a wavelength of 810  nm.  Lighter skin types do well with this type of laser, as do some darker skin types.
  • Nd: YAG lasers.  These emit a 1064 nm wavelength.  This laser is best for darker skin types, as the higher wavelength reaches deeper into the skin.  This helps to avoid superficial skin melanin,  which pigments our skin.
  • IPL or  Intense  Pulsed  Light. It has been used for hair removal.  Lasers emit light at one wavelength (like laser pointers in PowerPoint presentations).  IPL machines produce a range of wavelengths  (like the cone of light from a torch one sees in cartoons) and are not lasers.  So,  there  is  no  such  thing  as  an  “IPL  laser”  or  “IPL laser  hair  removal”-  it’s  a  marketing  ploy  for  businesses  that  have  IPL  machines  and  not  hair  removal  lasers (the  only  exception  to  the  rule  are  the  few  machines  out  there  that  have  both  lasers  and  IPL  machines  in them).  Several studies have shown that  IPL is not as effective as dedicated hair removal lasers, and carry a higher risk of burns, blisters, and changes in pigment.

In my experience,  the Alexandrite laser is the most effective laser for removing hair on the lighter skin, whereas the Nd: YAG is the safest and best laser for more darkly pigmented skin.  Remember,  every laser  has  a  “target.”  For hair removal lasers, the goal is to selectively target the pigment (in other words colour) which in this case is called melanin found in hair follicles.  Melanin is the reason why we have black or brown hair or shades in between.  The hair follicles are living cells which make hair below the surface of the skin.  When the melanin is selectively heated, this destroys the hair follicle cells.  The lighter the hair, the less melanin the hair follicles will have in them.  As a result, hair that is blonde, white or grey does not improve with laser hair removal.  In my practice,  I have actually seen some patients notice a decrease in lighter hairs,  but it ’s the exception and not the rule.

Melanin is also present in skin and is the cause for dark skin and suntans.  It is the same target that the hair removal laser is trying to reach in hair follicles.  Hair removal lasers may target the melanin in the skin as well as in the hair follicles which sometimes results in burns,  blisters, and change in skin pigmentation.  As a result,  lower settings and longer laser pulse times must be used for darker skin to avoid damage.  As a consequence, more overall treatment sessions will usually be necessary.

Remember, laser hair removal is a medical procedure and you should always consult with a doctor who has extensive experience in lasers and laser hair removal.  This will maximize your chances of a great result.

Thanks for reading!

Dr.  Tim  –  Sydney  Cosmetic  Plastic  Surgeon

www.cosmeticculture.com.au
www.drtim.com.au