Cosmetic Surgery Tip #19: You can get an areola or nipple reduction

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Oftentimes women who get a breast reduction or lift will also have an areola or nipple reduction so the nipple-areola complex is proportional to the new size of the breast. The area around the nipple is very forgiving when scarring.

Photo Credit: Saul Steinberg “Masquerade”

Cosmetic Surgery tip #28: Do not drink alcohol 72 hours prior/after cosmetic surgery

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Alcohol suppresses the immune system and should be avoided around the time of cosmetic surgery.

Photo Credit: Saul Steinberg “Masquerade”

Cosmetic Surgery Tip #36: Build a support structure

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Rely on your family and friends to help you during the stressful time of a surgery.  From assisting with household chores to providing emotional support, having them around is a plus.

Photo Credit: Saul Steinberg “Masquerade”

Cosmetic Surgery Tip #1: Know your practitioner

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Select a qualified, reputable plastic surgeon to perform your procedure and research them thoroughly. Find out how long they have been practicing, what qualifications they offer, which areas or procedures they specialise in, and you will slowly get an idea whether they are the right doctor for you.

Photo Credit: Saul Steinberg “Masquerade”

Cosmetic Surgery Tip #36: Research the procedure

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The internet provides a plethora of information about specific cosmetic procedures so it’s easier than ever to do your research. Watch videos of procedures being carried out, read the stories of people who have already undergone the procedure and engage in conversation on reputable forums and with friends who’ve had the procedure done. All of this will help you to make an informed decision about whether this is the right procedure for you.  Remember with all that information out there, some of it may be conflicting; it is important to verify this information with your plastic surgeon.

Photo Credit: Saul Steinberg “Masquerade”

Supplements and Cosmetic Surgery

Herbal supplements and vitamins are known to have a significant and measurable effect on promoting wound healing, reducing bruising,  enhancing immunity, and reducing oxidation caused by both surgery and anaesthetic drugs. However, these supplements are still drugs that could cause dangerous side effects during cosmetic surgery. About 50% of cosmetic surgery patients take supplements (usually more than one), but often do not tell their surgeons because they assume they are safe.  Some  of  the  most  popular  herbal  supplements  taken  are  chondroitin,  echinacea, and  glucosamine:

  • Chondroitin is often used to treat osteoarthritis.  People using chondroitin may suffer from bleeding complications during surgery, particularly when used in combination with doctor-prescribed blood-thinning medications (like warfarin).
  • Echinacea is often used for the prevention and treatment of viral, bacterial and fungal infections, as well as chronic wounds, ulcers, and arthritis.  However, it can trigger immunosuppression, causing poor wound healing and infection.
  • Glucosamine, often offered in conjunction with chondroitin, contains chemical elements that mimic human insulin, and may artificially cause low blood sugars during surgery.

Other common supplements taken by patients that may cause thinning of the blood are the “4  Gs”  (gingko biloba, garlicginseng, and ginger), fish oils and Vitamin E.

Cosmetic surgery should be viewed with the same care and concern as heart or brain surgery. Everything we do is important for our patients, so every precaution and safety should be taken to minimise complications from surgery and anaesthesia. Remember, we need your help and cooperation at all times.  Advise us of every drug you take, prescribed and non-prescribed and cease taking any blood thinning agents 2 weeks prior to surgery unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

Thanks for reading!

Dr. Tim  –  Sydney  Cosmetic  Plastic  Surgeon

www.cosmeticculture.com.au
www.drtim.com.au

How Do You Repair Torn Earlobes?

The earlobes are the lowest part of the ears made of skin and a small amount of fatty tissue in between. There are large variations in size, form, and shape. The earlobes serve women (and men) as popular locations for placing jewellery. Often, the earlobes are pierced to fit various forms of ear ornaments ranging from studs to earrings which can occasionally set them up for trouble.

Excessive weight or trauma can easily overcome the strength of the earlobe tissues leading to a tear, which if complete, results in a split ear. Some people with rather thin earlobes who favour wearing heavy earrings, experience a gradual elongation of the ear-piercing tract such that it becomes slit-like and often too large. Another problem is that the earlobes can be torn by accidental trauma. This split may be unattractive and renders the earlobe unusable for most jewellery. Sometimes, clip-on earrings can still be fitted and are used to camouflage the earlobe tear.

The repair of torn earlobes is relatively simple. The procedure is routinely performed in the office under local anaesthesia with an optional sedative. After planning and marking, a small amount of lignocaine numbing solution is deposited. I favour a three-layer repair done under loupe magnification. But it is very important to remove the damaged ear-piercing tract or to trim the edges of the split if the earlobe has been torn through completely.

Then the three-layer closure consists of closing the outer layer of skin, the fatty tissue between the two layers of the skin and finally the skin in the back of the earlobe. Typically, the surgeon must take great pains to avoid any notching at the bottom of the earlobe. The fine sutures on the skin are usually removed within 7 days. Small amounts of antibiotic ointment are applied at home for a few days ensuring cleanliness. The healed earlobe has usually a barely visible pencil-fine straight or zigzag scar line.

People often ask if the ears can be pierced again. They can but typically you should wait three months after the earlobe has been repaired. Preferably piercing should not be done within the scar, as this can stretch and inevitably result in another clot.

Thanks for reading!

Dr. Tim – Sydney Cosmetic Plastic Surgeon

www.cosmeticculture.com.au
www.drtim.com.au

Cosmetic Surgery Tip #16: You might lose feeling in your nipples after a breast augmentation or reduction

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Loss of sensation in the nipples can occur whenever there is surgery to the breasts. This depends on a number of factors, including breast shape and surgery type. Even if you lose sensation in your nipples, they will still respond to cold and stimulation ie. they will still be able to get hard even if you can’t feel it.

Photo Credit: Saul Steinberg “Masquerade”

Cosmetic Surgery tip #30: Supplement with a natural stool softener

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After surgery, many patients find that they are very constipated for several days which can cause discomfort.  Dehydration, narcotics and anaesthetic agents used during surgery all contribute to the digestive issue.  You can prevent this problem by eating a few prunes each day just prior to and after your surgery.  You can also take medical stool softeners like oral Dulcolax® or Microlax® enema for post-op constipation.

Photo Credit: Saul Steinberg “Masquerade”

Cosmetic Surgery Tip #17: Reconsider having breast augmentation with a strong family history of breast cancer, are obese, or smoke

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All these factors increase risks and complications during and after surgery. If you have any significant medical issues, you need to be evaluated by your GP or specialist and cleared before having cosmetic breast surgery.

Photo Credit: Saul Steinberg “Masquerade”