Dangers of Excessive Weight Loss

Many women that I see for body contouring usually have tried exercise and dieting to some extent or other prior to resorting to liposuction or surgery. A minority of women have taken drastic measures like excessive gymming or starvation diets to try and fit into single digit or low teen dress sizes. This can, however, cause irreparable health problems like the following:

  • no menstrual cycle or abnormal menstruation in women.
  • prevent women from becoming pregnant.
  • cause premature delivery, the birth of low-weight babies who are also undernourished.
  • loss of libido due to suppression of Follicle  Stimulating  Hormone (FSH) and other secondary sex hormones in the brain.
  • suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis which is responsible for the release of sex hormones
  • anorexia or poor nutrition can lead to osteoporosis.

My advice is that no weight loss or fitness program should be undertaken without the direct supervision of your doctor.  Whether you should lose weight, how much you should lose and how you should lose it are decisions that should be made by a medical professional, who may need to refer you to a nutritionist or endocrinologist for further work-up and counseling.  If you want to lose weight and keep it off, your doctor must be part of the equation.

Thanks for reading!

Dr. Tim  –  Sydney Cosmetic Plastic Surgeon

www.cosmeticculture.com.au
www.drtim.com.au

Cosmetic Surgery Tip #36: Research the procedure

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The internet provides a plethora of information about specific cosmetic procedures so it’s easier than ever to do your research. Watch videos of procedures being carried out, read the stories of people who have already undergone the procedure and engage in conversation on reputable forums and with friends who’ve had the procedure done. All of this will help you to make an informed decision about whether this is the right procedure for you.  Remember with all that information out there, some of it may be conflicting; it is important to verify this information with your plastic surgeon.

Photo Credit: Saul Steinberg “Masquerade”

Cosmetic Surgery Tip #11: Your first breast surgery may not be your last

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Twenty-five percent of women will need another surgery after 10 years because implants don’t last forever. The implant could begin to leak over time or a “scar shell” called capsular contracture could develop around it, warping the shape and causing a need for new implants. Weight loss, pregnancy, and change in preference are other factors that could lead the patient having another surgery after a few years.

Photo Credit: Saul Steinberg “Masquerade”

Cosmetic Surgery Tip #25: Schedule cosmetic surgery when you’re healthy

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If you are planning cosmetic surgery, try to schedule it during a period of relatively good health.  This will give your immune system the best chance toward a speedy recovery.  Many patients find scheduling their surgery at the year-end ideal when they can bridge a few days off with paid vacation time.

Photo Credit: Saul Steinberg “Masquerade”

Cosmetic Surgery Tip #31: Increase your protein intake

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Two of the most important healing elements are calories and protein.  Extra protein is needed to build new tissue and blood vessels, repair injured tissue and step up production of cells that repair the wound.  Choose high quality protein sources like fish, poultry, beans & legumes or lean cuts of meat.

Photo Credit: Saul Steinberg “Masquerade”

Cosmetic Surgery Tip #12: Patients take 5-7 days off work for a breast augmentation (same for reduction)

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You won’t be feeling 100% after that week, but you’ll be in good-enough shape to head back to the office if your job doesn’t require manual labour. However, if the implant is placed behind the muscle instead of on top (many women choose to do this for a more realistic look and less chance of a “scar shell” or capsular contracture forming around the implant), recovery will be a little harder and you might be sore longer.

Photo Credit: Saul Steinberg “Masquerade”

Breast Augmentation Part 3 of 4: The Plastic Surgeon

I am amazed at how many patients spend more time shopping for a TV or washing machine than they spend selecting a plastic surgeon. Selecting your surgeon should be the single most important thing that you can do to assure an optimal result.

You should have a checklist of essential things to look for in a plastic surgeon:

1)  Certified by the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, the only college recognised by the Australian Medical Council that can train surgeons in Australia

2)  Be a Member of the Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) and the Australasian Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS)

3)  Has hospital privileges to do breast augmentation at an accredited hospital or day surgery facility

4)  Subspecialises in cosmetic surgery

5)  Super specialises in breast augmentation

6)  Recommended by a knowledgeable friend or doctor

7)  Has a curriculum vitae that documents scientific presentations and publications

There are also a few less reliable points that I would like to address when choosing a plastic surgeon. Advertisements and media coverage is paid for by the plastic surgeon and does not necessarily reflect how knowledgeable, competent or experienced they are. Your local doctor may not be in the know of who is best to do breast augmentation and may not have an interest in cosmetic surgery to find out either. Some just refer to surgeons who are their friends from medical school, are in the local area and thus convenient, or who may be paid for by the surgeon to refer you. Never listen to recommendations from anyone who is an “armchair expert” or who has no in-depth knowledge of breast augmentation.

At the end of the day, look at the plastic surgeon’s results to see how good they are. Be very careful with “glamour shots” that can deceive because of lighting, patient positioning and camera angle. They may even be “photo-shopped” or airbrushed. Some plastic surgeons may have models as patients that they have operated on their face but not their breasts (which was performed by another surgeon) and use them for advertising breast augmentation.

There are a further number of “red flags” that you should take notice of. These are:

1)  Completed training in a specialty other than plastic surgery

2)  Certified in an unrelated college

3)  Not a member of ASPS and ASAPS

4)  No hospital privileges

5)  If you are given false or misleading information – claims that are too good to be true.

6)  Unwilling to provide you answers to questions regarding credentials or their curriculum vitae

7)  When the office staff are not courteous, knowledgeable, or don’t spend enough time with you, and don’t tell you what you need to know. Beware of staff who give you all fluff, but no substance, and don’t offer to send you any information. Always insist that the price is broken down into the following categories: surgeon fees, anaesthetist fees, costs of implants, operating room fees, hospital stay fees, laboratory fees, mammogram or ultrasound fees, any other fees. Ask how long the prices on the quote last for. Remember, there is no such thing as bargain surgery. Have you ever seen top-quality surgery for a bargain price? How is the bargain surgeon able to offer such a good price?

When visiting the plastic surgeon’s rooms, look around and take notice of the little things. It should be a quiet, comfortable and modern, an atmosphere that reflects the good taste of the plastic surgeon. The organisation, function, and flow of the plastic surgeon’s office is a reflection of the surgeon’s personality and habits. Think about it. If the office looks messy and unclean, doesn’t that reflect badly on the surgeon who accepts this scenario?

Most of the time, you will recognise a good plastic surgeon without the surgeon having to tell you. If they have integrity, are caring and thorough, then this will definitely contribute to what you will get in the operating room and after.

Question:  What factors do you consider important when choosing a plastic surgeon to perform a breast augmentation? You can leave a comment below.

Why “Celebrity Imitation” with Cosmetic Surgery?

Why do people try to imitate celebrities’ actual faces and bodies? Why do people think that a celebrity’s physical appearance can be copied? Occasionally I would get a patient presenting to my office for consultation requesting Nicole Kidman’s nose or Kim Kardashian’s butt. Cosmetic surgery is not the same as Mr. and Mrs. Potato Heads, with interchangeable noses, ears, lips etc.

Plastic surgeons must work with what you have (reality) and you must understand that what you want (desire) may not be achievable.

We as plastic surgeons are trained to perform delicate operations to enhance or improve people’s physical characteristics in an effort to acquire a more desirable feature. We are also taught to operate within the safest parameters possible because cosmetic surgery is elective surgery, which means it’s a want not a need. Therefore, it is vital for us to properly screen all prospective patients to be certain that they are safe candidates for this surgery. There are basic conditions that should be considered, contraindications to surgery which include physical abnormalities, medical problems that can complicate the surgery or put the patient at unnecessary risk, psychological abnormalities, unrealistic expectations, inappropriate motivations and inherent physical characteristics that hinder the achievement of the best possible result.

For people considering “celebrity imitation”, you should reconsider why you want to look like a particular celebrity.

Why is it that you are trying to become someone else? Why are you unhappy with you?  Furthermore, what if a celebrity’s image changes? As they say, “the media darling of this week is the rehab tabloid queen the next.”

Cosmetic surgery is a big change and so it’s important not to lose yourself as you start to look like someone else. I am reminded from a quote of Oscar Wilde, ”Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

Question: Is it worth getting cosmetic surgery to look like a celebrity?  You can leave a comment below.

Cosmetic Surgery Tip #36: Build a support structure

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Rely on your family and friends to help you during the stressful time of a surgery.  From assisting with household chores to providing emotional support, having them around is a plus.

Photo Credit: Saul Steinberg “Masquerade”

How Do You Repair Torn Earlobes?

The earlobes are the lowest part of the ears made of skin and a small amount of fatty tissue in between. There are large variations in size, form, and shape. The earlobes serve women (and men) as popular locations for placing jewellery. Often, the earlobes are pierced to fit various forms of ear ornaments ranging from studs to earrings which can occasionally set them up for trouble.

Excessive weight or trauma can easily overcome the strength of the earlobe tissues leading to a tear, which if complete, results in a split ear. Some people with rather thin earlobes who favour wearing heavy earrings, experience a gradual elongation of the ear-piercing tract such that it becomes slit-like and often too large. Another problem is that the earlobes can be torn by accidental trauma. This split may be unattractive and renders the earlobe unusable for most jewellery. Sometimes, clip-on earrings can still be fitted and are used to camouflage the earlobe tear.

The repair of torn earlobes is relatively simple. The procedure is routinely performed in the office under local anaesthesia with an optional sedative. After planning and marking, a small amount of lignocaine numbing solution is deposited. I favour a three-layer repair done under loupe magnification. But it is very important to remove the damaged ear-piercing tract or to trim the edges of the split if the earlobe has been torn through completely.

Then the three-layer closure consists of closing the outer layer of skin, the fatty tissue between the two layers of the skin and finally the skin in the back of the earlobe. Typically, the surgeon must take great pains to avoid any notching at the bottom of the earlobe. The fine sutures on the skin are usually removed within 7 days. Small amounts of antibiotic ointment are applied at home for a few days ensuring cleanliness. The healed earlobe has usually a barely visible pencil-fine straight or zigzag scar line.

People often ask if the ears can be pierced again. They can but typically you should wait three months after the earlobe has been repaired. Preferably piercing should not be done within the scar, as this can stretch and inevitably result in another clot.

Thanks for reading!

Dr. Tim – Sydney Cosmetic Plastic Surgeon

www.cosmeticculture.com.au
www.drtim.com.au