Cosmetic Surgery Tip #25: Schedule cosmetic surgery when you’re healthy

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If you are planning cosmetic surgery, try to schedule it during a period of relatively good health.  This will give your immune system the best chance toward a speedy recovery.  Many patients find scheduling their surgery at the year-end ideal when they can bridge a few days off with paid vacation time.

Photo Credit: Saul Steinberg “Masquerade”

Cosmetic Surgery Tip #14: You can’t go from small to huge all at once

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If you’re starting with a small A cup, don’t expect to go up to a DD cup in one procedure. It’s important to set realistic goals. Your body and skin need time to adjust to drastic changes, so a plastic surgeon will likely suggest going up only a couple cup sizes at first, then increasing the implant size over the course of a few years.

Photo Credit: Saul Steinberg “Masquerade”

Wabi-Sabi In Cosmetic Surgery – Imperfect, Impermanent, and Incomplete.

Celebrities, models, and socialites have highlighted some severe complications (including death) from undergoing cosmetic surgery in their pursuit of perfection. This is very concerning and makes me reflect on what beauty is all about. I am reminded at this point of Wabi-Sabi, the Japanese philosophy that embraces the beauty of things imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete.

It is a beauty of things modest and humble. It would be interesting to see how much of this ancient Japanese philosophy could be embraced in the world of cosmetic surgery and what a difference it could make.

Wabi-Sabi represents the exact opposite of the Western ideal of great beauty as something symmetrical, extraordinary and enduring. Wabi-Sabi is about the minor and the hidden, the tentative and the ephemeral: things so subtle and evanescent they are invisible to unrefined eyes.

Simplicity is at the core of things Wabi-Sabi. Wabi-Sabi embraces the “less is more” ideal talked about today, yet often ignored. Cosmetic surgery needs a lot of Wabi-Sabi.

Thanks for reading!

Dr.  Tim  –  Sydney  Cosmetic  Plastic  Surgeon

www.cosmeticculture.com.au
www.drtim.com.au

Cosmetic Surgery Tip #4: Meet them in person

 

It is crucial that you meet the plastic surgeon who will carry out your procedure before the day of your treatment. Not all practices demand that patients meet the practitioner who will deliver the procedure in advance. If you are advised that it is not possible to meet in person with the practitioner ahead of treatment, you should not progress any further and choose to go elsewhere. Any reputable plastic surgeon will demand that they meet the patient themselves beforehand. It is also important that you feel comfortable with your plastic surgeon and that you trust them.

 

Breast Augmentation Part 3 of 4: The Plastic Surgeon

I am amazed at how many patients spend more time shopping for a TV or washing machine than they spend selecting a plastic surgeon. Selecting your surgeon should be the single most important thing that you can do to assure an optimal result.

You should have a checklist of essential things to look for in a plastic surgeon:

1)  Certified by the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, the only college recognised by the Australian Medical Council that can train surgeons in Australia

2)  Be a Member of the Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) and the Australasian Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS)

3)  Has hospital privileges to do breast augmentation at an accredited hospital or day surgery facility

4)  Subspecialises in cosmetic surgery

5)  Super specialises in breast augmentation

6)  Recommended by a knowledgeable friend or doctor

7)  Has a curriculum vitae that documents scientific presentations and publications

There are also a few less reliable points that I would like to address when choosing a plastic surgeon. Advertisements and media coverage is paid for by the plastic surgeon and does not necessarily reflect how knowledgeable, competent or experienced they are. Your local doctor may not be in the know of who is best to do breast augmentation and may not have an interest in cosmetic surgery to find out either. Some just refer to surgeons who are their friends from medical school, are in the local area and thus convenient, or who may be paid for by the surgeon to refer you. Never listen to recommendations from anyone who is an “armchair expert” or who has no in-depth knowledge of breast augmentation.

At the end of the day, look at the plastic surgeon’s results to see how good they are. Be very careful with “glamour shots” that can deceive because of lighting, patient positioning and camera angle. They may even be “photo-shopped” or airbrushed. Some plastic surgeons may have models as patients that they have operated on their face but not their breasts (which was performed by another surgeon) and use them for advertising breast augmentation.

There are a further number of “red flags” that you should take notice of. These are:

1)  Completed training in a specialty other than plastic surgery

2)  Certified in an unrelated college

3)  Not a member of ASPS and ASAPS

4)  No hospital privileges

5)  If you are given false or misleading information – claims that are too good to be true.

6)  Unwilling to provide you answers to questions regarding credentials or their curriculum vitae

7)  When the office staff are not courteous, knowledgeable, or don’t spend enough time with you, and don’t tell you what you need to know. Beware of staff who give you all fluff, but no substance, and don’t offer to send you any information. Always insist that the price is broken down into the following categories: surgeon fees, anaesthetist fees, costs of implants, operating room fees, hospital stay fees, laboratory fees, mammogram or ultrasound fees, any other fees. Ask how long the prices on the quote last for. Remember, there is no such thing as bargain surgery. Have you ever seen top-quality surgery for a bargain price? How is the bargain surgeon able to offer such a good price?

When visiting the plastic surgeon’s rooms, look around and take notice of the little things. It should be a quiet, comfortable and modern, an atmosphere that reflects the good taste of the plastic surgeon. The organisation, function, and flow of the plastic surgeon’s office is a reflection of the surgeon’s personality and habits. Think about it. If the office looks messy and unclean, doesn’t that reflect badly on the surgeon who accepts this scenario?

Most of the time, you will recognise a good plastic surgeon without the surgeon having to tell you. If they have integrity, are caring and thorough, then this will definitely contribute to what you will get in the operating room and after.

Question:  What factors do you consider important when choosing a plastic surgeon to perform a breast augmentation? You can leave a comment below.

Cosmetic Surgery Tip #18: You can move fat from elsewhere on your body to your boobs or butt

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It’s a new process called autologous fat transfer. The purpose of fat grafting is to augment or fill in volume-deficient areas. Of course, you must have donor sites from which fat can be taken. It is important that you do not have any circulation problems, either from a medical condition or smoking. Few people are candidates for this procedure to the breasts. If you desire a modest increase in breast size, you are a good candidate for fat grafting to the breast, but your breasts should already have a nice shape and good skin tone. If you have poor skin, sagging breasts, or want a significant increase in breast size, breast augmentation with fat transfer is not for you. The problem with only using fat for breast enhancement lies in getting large volumes of fat to predictably “take.” Many people who desire a fuller, more rounded buttock will opt for a “Brazilian butt lift,” which uses fat transfer to provide a more curvaceous buttock without the use of an implant. Liposuction is commonly used to both sculpt the surrounding area and collect the autologous fat to be injected.

Photo Credit: Saul Steinberg “Masquerade”

Cosmetic Surgery Tip #36: Research the procedure

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The internet provides a plethora of information about specific cosmetic procedures so it’s easier than ever to do your research. Watch videos of procedures being carried out, read the stories of people who have already undergone the procedure and engage in conversation on reputable forums and with friends who’ve had the procedure done. All of this will help you to make an informed decision about whether this is the right procedure for you.  Remember with all that information out there, some of it may be conflicting; it is important to verify this information with your plastic surgeon.

Photo Credit: Saul Steinberg “Masquerade”

Cosmetic Surgery Tip #23: Your boobs do not need to be a minimum size for a reduction

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This is all based on personal preference. Think of boob size in terms of a scale from small to large. Based on breast size before the procedure and desired breast size afterward, there are a number of incision options for a reduction for a huge range of results. You can even choose to get a reduction and an implant to replace some of the volume that you’ve lost over time.

Photo Credit: Saul Steinberg “Masquerade”

Cosmetic Surgery Tip #22: Augmented breasts will affect your posture just like the weight of natural breasts would

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The weight difference between equal volumes of saline, silicone, and breast tissue is slim to none, so a natural C cup and an augmented C cup are very similar in weight. If you choose an implant size proportional to your frame, you will see little effect on your posture. However, if you choose large implants, you will feel the effects.

Photo Credit: Saul Steinberg “Masquerade”

Cosmetic Surgery Tip #26: Stay well-hydrated by drinking water

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It is important to drink at least 6-8 glasses of high quality water each day and especially the day prior to surgery, to help cleanse and hydrate the body.  Water is especially important prior to surgery, as fluid intake is reduced the day of surgery.  To avoid complications during surgery, be sure that you do not drink anything after midnight the night prior to your surgery, unless told otherwise by your plastic surgeon.

Photo Credit: Saul Steinberg “Masquerade”